3.3.4 Setting timetables for implementation

Implementing a national school connectivity plan is often a long-term process. It is essential for a school connectivity plan to have a timeframe, particularly given the multiple, inter-related variables that need to be taken into consideration. Those variables include sequencing of schools to be connected, the status of the local Internet network, whether appropriate policies and regulations are in place and whether funding is available. A realistic timetable helps to ensure that implementation goals are feasible and that the project remains on track, particularly if ongoing monitoring and accomplishment milestones are built into the timetable.

Morocco’s Generalization of ICTs in Learning (GENIE) programme was created in 2005 to enhance the availability of computer labs with Internet connectivity in public schools. The first phase of the programme envisaged a three year deployment timetable.78 It is interesting to note that a review of targets was built into the original programme, and a revision of numbers was made two years after the start of the programme (See Table 3-4, below).79

Table 3-4: Timetable for Morocco’s GENIE Programme

Target number by type of school and year

Primary

Junior secondary

Secondary

Total

%

Number of schools

%

Number of schools

%

Number of schools

Number of schools

Year 1

50%

3,387

75%

897

75%

474

2,152

Year 2

25%

1,694

25%

299

25%

159

2,152

Year 3

25%

1,694

-

-

-

-

1,694

Total

100%

6,775

100%

1,196

100%

633

8,604

104,000 PCs and 17,200 printers in three years.

Source: ANRT.

Initially scheduled to conclude in 2009, the GENIE programme was extended for a further four years under Digital Morocco 2013. An additional 9,260 institutions are scheduled to receive multimedia resources and Internet-enabled computers. In addition to GENIE, Digital Morocco 2013 also includes provisions to subsidize computer equipment, laptops and Internet access for teaching staff and engineering students. For the period 2009-2013, a number of goals were defined, including better coordination between the ICT and education sectors and integration of education reform goals into the GENIE programme. There also was an enhanced focus on governance, monitoring and evaluation, and ambitious goals were set to equip 9,260 schools by 2013, at an estimated cost of approximately MAD 1.172 billion (USD 149 million). In addition, the programme provided for further funds to allow an additional 200,000 teachers to benefit from ICT training and for digital content to be further developed.80

One goal of the Medium Term Philippine Development Plan for 2004-2010 was that every public high school in the country should have at least one computer (the level of computerization in high schools at the time the plan was launched was 80 per cent).81 The Plan also included a provision for providing about 30 high schools a year with Internet connectivity. The government decided that Internet connectivity in schools was proceeding too slowly, so it announced a priority connection programme in May 2009. The Internet Connectivity Project mandated that all public high schools be connected to the Internet by the end of 2010.82

78 http://www.anrt.ma/missions/service-universel/genie
79 Moratoire pour une nouvelle stratégie nationale en matière d’intégration des technologies d’information et de communication pour l’enseignement (TICE), avalable at : http://www.portailtice.ma/fr/node/19
80 Adapted from : http://www.anrt.ma/missions/genie/presentation-du-programme-genie
81Medium Term Philippine Development Plan (MTPDP) 2004-2010, Chapter 18: Education, available at: http://www.neda.gov.ph/ads/mtpdp/MTPDP2004-2010/PDF/MTPDP%202004-2010%20NEDA_Chapterx18_Education.pdf
82“Launching the DEPED Internet Connectivity Project and Directing All Public High Schools to Subscribe to Internet Connectivity Services”, Order No. 50, Department of Education, Republic of the Philippines, May 2009, available at: http://former.deped.gov.ph/cpanel/uploads/issuanceImg/DO%20No.%2050,%20s.%202009.pdf

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